LONDON Love&Hate 愛と憎しみのロンドン

1999年のクリスマス・イヴにロンドンに。以来、友人達に送りつけていたプライヴェイト・メイル・マガジンがもと。※掲載されている全ての文章の無断引用・転載を禁じます。
Home未分類 | Dance | Sylvie Guillem | Royal Ballet | Royal Opera | Counselling | Sightseeing | Overseas Travel | Life in London(Good) | Life in London(Bad) | Japan (Nihon) | Bartoli | Royal Families | British English | Gardens | Songs | Psychology | Babysitting | Politics | Multiculture | Society | Writing Jobs | About this blog | Opera Ballet | News | Arts | Food | 07/Jul/2005 | Job Hunting | Written In English | Life in London (so so) | Speak to myself | Photo(s) of the day | The Daily Telegraph | The Guardian | BBC | Other sources | BrokenBritain | Frog/ Kaeru | Theatre | Books | 11Mar11 | Stage | Stamps | Transport | Summer London 2012 | Weather | Okinawa | War is crime | Christoph Prégardien | Cats | Referendum 23rd June | Brexit 

2007年02月の記事一覧

How we are understood by the British people

2007.02.27
Dear All,

Hope this mail finds you well.

I received an e-mail from a friend of mine who lives in a town of the South-West in the UK and works as a sort of chairman of the local comettee. I have got his permission to use a part of his e-mail.

According to him, they are having the Japanese local officers this week. They have already been informed of the reasons why the officers would like to visit them and discuss some issues of how local communities should improve the quality of life in rural area. However, they do still not fully understand why they were chosen by the officers.
Now, they have been very busy welcoming the officers and have learned some cultural differences between the countries. This is because my friend sent me the e-mail that he was just interested in what I would find the tips below.


Important tips on the culture and business etiquette:
Please forgive me, colleagues that are already aware of the following:

a.. The Japanese consider it rude to blow your nose in front of them (if desperate, please leave the room)
I would confess that this is absolutely right. When I went back to Japan in July 2005, I did this twice, one in a posh cafe and the other in a restaurant. Blowing my nose, though I did very quietly, silenced people there. I felt shame on me.

b.. The exchange of business cards (meishi) is very important as this helps them to establish hierarchy. No dog-eared cards! not that any of you would! When exchanging cards the card must both be given and received with both hands. When you have received the card please study it very carefully (and slowly), to show respect, if you wish clarification on anything it is fine to ask. Avoid putting it in a pocket!
I used to do this everyday in Japan and I did not like this ritual. This is why I was excluded by them, I guess.

c.. Those who dress according to their status or position impress the Japanese (the Chairman will be suitably attired)

d.. They do not like large hand gestures (they do not talk with their hands), unusual facial expressions (caution here because a smile can mean joy or displeasure) or any dramatic movements

e.. The Japanese prefer not to use the word no (although if they say yes you can usually tell if they mean no)
From my point of view, the British do too.

f.. I am informed that they will have an interpreter, please keep eye contact with the two gentlemen and not the interpreter. Also speak in small chunks so the interpreter can do their job. Avoid the interpreter asking you to be quiet!

g.. Finally they do have a little trouble with pronouncing the letter L, tends to come out as an R
This is actually other way round. Long time ago, I already gave up my hope that I would one day become able to distinguish L and R.

It is always fascinating to know how we are understood by the others. I think that these tips are quite good.
On the other hand, this sort of thing is highly likely to happen everywhere. For instance, when the people of a small town in Japan are visited by the British local officers, what might they concern? [Oh, shall we make fish and chips for lunch for them?], [Would we really need to keep eye contact with them even if we do not want to do?], or [Which should be first, milk or tea?] etc.

The year of 2008 is going to be special for both of us.
http://www.ukjapan2008.jp/en/
It would be a good opportunity for some of you to go to Japan though I would suggest not to go there in August unless you would love to be exhausted by heat there.

The 3rd of March is the special day for girls in Japan, which is called, [MO MO NO SEKKU] or [HINA MATSURI].
スポンサーサイト

イギリス人の見方、ある一例

2007.02.26
親愛なる皆さん

 こんにちは。ロンドンは、天気悪いですけど、春がどんどん近づいているようです。

 下記のもの、グラストンベリー(サマセット)で町の名誉職についている友人からのものです。何でも、今週、日本から訪問客があるということでこんなの送ってくれました。友人によると、受け入れる側は、どうして、そしてどのようにしてサマセットが選ばれたのか、よく判らないそうで僕に、友人として意見を聞いてきたのですが、僕も皆目見当がつきません。

 訪問の目的よりも、後半の、日本人へのエチケットについて、面白いですよ。当っているような、ちょっと的外れなような。これを熱心に読んでいるイギリス人のお偉いさんの姿を想像してみては如何でしょうか。

The business men wish to visit Somerset County Council to learn from best practice, how performance can be improved and how they can achieve sustainable excellence. In particular they wish to learn how we apply the EFQM Excellence Model to drive continuous improvement in service delivery (the press release will not use the acronym EFQM)!
It would also seem, following a conversation with Warwick District Council's Chief Executive that one of the gentlemen is using the research here to inform a book that he is writing to support Local Authorities in Japan. They are visiting ourselves, they have been to Warwick and on Monday they are off to Blythe Valley Borough Council.

The gentlemen are members of 関西のある地方自治体です, an organisation that promotes performance improvement and excellence both in Local Government and the private sector in Japan.

Following Japanese tradition we will be presenting them with a gift at the end of visit. The Chairman has very kindly agreed to present them with an SCC coat of arms shield and we also have a copy of Somerset - a portrait in colour. They will also receive information packs and a few choice goodies from Waste etc.

Important tips on the culture and business etiquette: Please forgive me, colleagues that are already aware of the following:

a.. The Japanese consider it rude to blow your nose in front of them (if desperate, please leave the room)
b.. The exchange of business cards (meishi) is very important as this helps them to establish hierarchy. No dog-eared cards! not that any of you would! When exchanging cards the card must both be given and received with both hands. When you have received the card please study it very carefully (and slowly), to show respect, if you wish clarification on anything it is fine to ask. Avoid putting it in a pocket!
c.. Those who dress according to their status or position impress the Japanese (the Chairman will be suitably attired)
d.. They do not like large hand gestures (they do not talk with their hands), unusual facial expressions (caution here because a smile can mean joy or displeasure) or any dramatic movements
e.. The Japanese prefer not to use the word no (although if they say yes you can usually tell if they mean no)
f.. I am informed that they will have an interpreter, please keep eye contact with the two gentlemen and not the interpreter. Also speak in small chunks so the interpreter can do their job. Avoid the interpreter asking you to be quiet!
g.. Finally they do have a little trouble with pronouncing the letter L, tends to come out as an R

 現在、望外の喜びの仕事(お金にはなりませんが)が入って、てんてこ舞いです。

An advantage of being a Japanese

2007.02.23
Dear All,

Hello, hope this round robin mail finds you well.


Some of you may remember that I interviewed the Artistic Director of Sadler's Wells Theatre last July. At the same time, I approached the Royal Ballet to have an interview with the Director of the Company, Ms Monica Mason OBE. I simply expected that I would be provided an opportunity immediately.

However, nothing happened till last November. Several times, I called the chief press officer of the Royal Ballet, left messages on her answering machine and sent letters every month. But, nothing happened. A friend of mine, who is also a keen fan of the RB, told me one day that the officer was a bit cxx (censored). She seemed not to think about the company but to focus on her status. Frankly speaking, it is true.

Then, unexpectedly, I was invited to a small party at ROH last November and met a nice female officer from another department of the House. I told her what I was trying to do. She immediately understood that what I wanted to do would help the Royal Ballet attract more Japanese audience. So, she pushed the press officer.
The press officer phoned me finally, but she let me know the date of the interview less than 24 hours in advance that Ms Mason could meet me. I could not make it. After that, I did not hear anything from her again.

I did nearly give up my hope. Then, I saw Ms Mason at Sadler's Wells last Wednesday, 14th Feb and asked her directly to let me interview her. She immediately recognised who I was and promised me to meet me soon. After the disappointing evening by American Ballet Theatre on the day, I dashed to the flat and wrote the letters to Ms Mason as well as to the chief officer. The officer phoned me two days ago and gave me 48 hours advance notice.
Thursday is the most difficult day for me to deal with sudden changes, but this was the second and, I thought, maybe the last opportunity. So I managed to make it.

The interview with Ms Mason was absolutely rewarding. She was charming, calm and thoughtful. I thought that it was worth waiting for nine months to meet her. I also felt as if this happened in an exact right timing.
I found that she loved ballet, her company, her dancers, her colleagues and her audience. I was given 45 minutes to talk with her, but I wish I had been able to do for two hours at least. I immediately forgot the helpless officer and I thoroughly enjoyed talking with her and listening to her. When Ms Mason told me about her exciting memory with Magot Fonteyn, I was just thrilled.
I had a similar feeling when I met Mr Spalding at Sadler's Wells, it is stimulating to listen to people who are at the top of well-established organisations. For, though both Ms Mason and Mr Spalding look gentle, they clearly know who they are and what they can do for people as well as for themselves. They have something firm in them.
At the end of the interview, I told her that I would like to meet some of the dancers. I clearly understand that it was a sort of lip service, but she said to me, [I enjoyed this interview immensely, so I would tell the press officers to organise the interviews with the dancers for you]. Hoo Lay!!!!!

I can see my position. If I were a British, or if I were in Japan now, I am pretty sure that I could not have this opportunity. Since I am a Japanese who lives in London, I can get this chance. Until last year, I always felt guilty when I thought about using my status as a Japanese in the UK.
For the moment, my life has been awful. For instance, I should leave the current flat as soon as possible (I'm looking for an accommodation too) and it is a fact that it is going to take more years to finish my study. I wish I could settle in the flat, but I have to leave.
However, after the interview, I just felt, [How nice to be a Japanese here. I enjoy taking advantage of my being a Japanese]. Clearly, my advantage does not affect the life of the British. Though my life becomes tough, I am extremely and absolutely happy still. I have to admit that I was too excited to sleep last night.

By the way, since I moved to London seven years ago, I have been writing my own round robin e-mail in Japanese. The number of it are now more then 500. I send them to my friends in Japan as well as wherever my friends live. One of them forwards them to her friend, who is an editor. Two years ago, the editor asked me to give her all of my e-mails because she told me that it might be interesting to publish my e-mails as a diary. I thought how nice to have spare income in order to pay my tuition fee.
A few weeks after I sent her the files, she wrote to me:[It is really interesting to read your diary. Nonetheless, I am afraid that we would not publish it since your life in London is too much. The Japanese who are interested in the UK would love to know about afternoon tea, Beatrix Potter, Harry Potter etc, but not about the ill system of London Undergrounds, BT, Royal Mail or psychotherapy. I am sorry, but we cannot take risk]. If I worked with her, I would agree with her.

Any rate, though I do hate to listen to my voice, it is addictive to listen to Ms Mason. I just want to write a nice article for her and the Company and I wish I could write it in English to force all of you to read my article.

Thank you for reading this (too long, isn't it?) and please take care of yourself.

地方郵便局の存亡と暮らし

2007.02.20
溜め込んでいたねたをぼちぼちと。

 これは、昨年末に怒涛のように送った時に書こうと思っていたものですが、間が空いてしまいました。

 これまでも、皆さんが聞き飽きたであろうと確信するほどロイヤル・メイルへの愚痴を書いて来ましたが、ロンドンでは何が改善されることも無く。最近は、普通の葉書や封筒はけっこうきちんと届いているような感じです。が、普通郵便扱いの小包などは、端から持ってくる意思が無いようで、呼び鈴を鳴らさずに、さらっと「不在カード」をほおり込んでいきます。こんな状況ですから、最近では、家族には負担がかかって申し訳ないんですが、高額でも小包はEMSで送ってもらっています。なくされてしまうよりは、ずっとましですから。

 他の大都市も、状況は似たり寄ったりではないかと想像します。が、これが地方、特に小さな村や、スコットランドに多い離島になると、郵便局、また長年地域のことを知り尽くした郵便配達員の存在は、コミュニティにとってかけがえの無いものです。
 しかしながら、ロイヤル・メイル本体は大赤字で、事業の改善も見られらない。ならば、経費削減で、地方の郵便局を減らしちゃえ、となんだか日本と同様なことがおきています。

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6164805.stm

 BBCのニュースの他に、昨年末には全国紙のThe Daily Telegraphやロンドンの夕刊紙The Evening Standardで郵便局を閉じるな、と言うキャンペーンがかなり長期間に渡って展開されていました。
 都市部の郵便局と違って、イギリスの過疎地の郵便局は、町や村で雑貨屋を営んでいる人が、店の中に郵便局を併設していることが多いです。ですから、そこで暮らす人々にとって、新聞を買うついでに年金を引き出そうとか、また利用者のことを良く知っている店主、兼郵便局長からすれば、彼らが郵便局を利用することで、自分の本業も存続できる、という利点があるそうです。
 ロイヤル・メイルの経営陣は、そんなことでは利益増収につながらない。例えば小さな村の郵便局で、年金生活者が現金を引き出すのは、ロイヤル・メイルにとっては手間がかかるだけで黒字になんてならない、赤字が増えるだけだ。今の時代、インターネットが普及しているんだから、郵便局で年金を下ろす必要は無いだろう。銀行のオンライン・バンキングを使えばいいじゃないか、と。利用者のニーズを知っていながら、知らない振りをしている、まさしく暴論を掲げています。
 まず、年金だけで細々と暮らしている高齢者の皆さんが、銀行口座を開設する高いハードルを越えられるのかなり難しいはずです。更に、仮に口座を持てたとしても、すぐにインターネット・バンキングを彼らが駆使するとは、正直な所、思えません。ロイヤル・メイルの経営陣だって、自分の親の世代、70歳、80歳の皆さんがインターネットを使えるとは思っていないでしょう。でも、「だって、こんな便利なものが有るんだから、わざわざ郵便局に来る必要なんて無いでしょ」、の一点ばり。
 このロイヤル・メイルの暴論を最初に新聞で読んだとき、「今の時代、本当に便利になったのかな?」、と考えてしまいました。選択肢がたくさんあるようでも、その選択肢を作りあげる側に消費者はいなくて、常にサーヴィスを提供する側だけが選択肢を創り上げ、供給している。供給側が選択肢を作る過程で対象から漏れてしまった人々は、選択肢を選ぶという権利さえ与えられない。なんだか、とても窮屈な時代になってきているように感じています。
 例えば、僕自身の生活でこれに近い状況にあるのは、携帯電話。「カメラ機能なんて要らない、音楽のダウン・ロードなんて、やり方知らないし、知る必要もないし。電話とテキストの送受信機能だけで事足りるんだから」、と拳を振り上げて力説しても、そんな携帯電話、もうないです。「いらなーーーーい」、と主張しても欲しい選択肢は、ないです。
 平均寿命が延びつづける一方で、生活の楽しさを自分の人生の主役として享受できる期間は、どんどん短くなってきているよう、というとネガティヴすぎるでしょうか。

 閑話休題。先月送ったヨーロッパを中心にしたロイヤル・ファミリーの行事情報には、返信、2通しか来ませんでした。やっぱり皆さん引いちゃったんだなと思いつつ、最新号に、オランダを訪問したエリザベス女王の写真が掲載されていました。タラップを降りたところで、オランダのベアトリクス女王が近づきお互いの頬にキスをする場面の写真です。そこに写っているエリザベス女王の笑顔、今まで見たこともないような嬉しそうなものでした。思うに、国家君主という望めばなれるなんてものではない、とても稀な職業についている数少ない同性の友人に会うことが出来て、嬉しかったのだと思います。

 溜め込んであるねたは、現在の所あと4つ。
Society    ↑Top

娘達の成長

2007.02.19
親愛なる皆さん

 こんにちは。日本同様、イギリスもこれ以上は冬の寒さは戻らないまま、春を迎えそうな暖かい日が続いています。

 別に隠し子がいるわけではありません。皆さんの注目を惹こうと思いました。

 以前送ったメールをファイルとして添付してありますが、過去4年、一番楽しく友人づきあいをしているスコットランド人の友人の二人のお嬢さんたちの成長ぶりに、驚くことが最近ありました。

 まず現在13歳のH。初めて彼女に会った時、Hはまだ9歳。僕も、今と比べれば英語もまだまだ拙く。また、心理学部で発達心理学は学んでいたものの、9歳の女の子の心がどれだけ不安定なものなのかは理解していませんでした。自分ではHとコミュニケイションできていたと思っていましたが、彼女にしてみれば、思春期前のただでさえ不安定な年頃の時に、変な日本人に会うことは時に負担だったのではないか、と今は思います。
 いろいろ難しいことが重なって、2004年の9月から2006年の7月まで、Hはロンドン郊外の寄宿学校に行っていました。その頃はそう頻繁に会うことは無かったのですが、会ったとしても会話なんか全く成立しないことのほうが多かったです。僕は何が共通の話題になるか判らず、彼女は僕が彼女の寄宿学校での生活を理解できるとは思っていなかったようです。
 それが、ロンドン中心部にある進学校で知られる女子高の編入試験(難関だそうです)に合格し、学校に行き始めた昨年の9月以降、会話が、コミュニケイションが成立するようになりました。僕が成長したというよりも、Hの能力が開花した、ということだと思います。
 昨年のHの誕生日(9月)に、僕自身が勉強の壁にぶち当っていたので、何にもしてあげられませんでした。漸くちょっと落ち着いた先月、Hを子供も楽しめるようなパフォーミング・アーツに連れていきました。上演中にHの顔を見ると、さほど楽しんでいないのは判っていました。で、インターヴァル中に期待しないで「どうだった?」、と尋ねると、すらすらとどの場面が良かった、どのパフォーマーが良くなかった、と。それがまた的確で、さらに僕が尋ねると、どうしてそう思ったのかを詳しく説明し始めました。それがまた理路整然としているんです。僕は単に、「子供って、こんな風に成長していくものなのか」、と感心しきりでした。
 今の所、自分自身の子供を持てるかどうかは定かではないですが、13歳の娘がいてもおかしくはないわけだし、親になると、こんな楽しみがあるんだな、と。

 で、下のMは現在4歳。まるで9歳のときのHをそのままそっくり再現しているようで、更にませています。彼女がこの世に生まれてきた40分後からの付き合いですが、最近、僕には冷たいのが悲しいです。
 Hが通っている女子高の付属幼稚園の試験に合格し、昨年の9月から、リージェンツ・ストリートの北より、言い換えれば繁華街からはやや離れた所にある、オフィスやいくつかの大使館がご近所にある、いわゆるお嬢様学校です。場所柄、年間の学費が気になったので友人に尋ねたところ、日本円で約200万だそうです。これはやっぱり、高いんでしょうね。
 本題。友人から、Mの誕生日パーティーを2月の第一金曜日に学校でやるから見に来ないかと誘われたのは、先月の半ば。「Mの誕生は12月だし、もうやったじゃない」、「そうなんだけど、親同士の交流を図るために、毎週金曜日に誰かがパーティーを開くのよ。最近、私立学校では流行っているのよ」、と。
 学校の正規のカリキュラムが終わってから準備をはじめてパーティーは余興もいれて正味2時間。手伝いの人手も必要ということだったので、行きました。学校に着いたときは丁度校舎(エドワーディアンの白亜のビルディングです)の玄関で、生徒たち一人一人に先生がさよならを言っていました。さすがお嬢様学校、正面玄関には、親のほかにお手伝いさんらしき人もたくさん迎えに来ていました。女子校に行ったのは初めての経験でしたが、嬉しそうに親に駆け寄る子、激しく泣きじゃくっている子、親の手を振り払う子と様々で、僕にはさながら阿鼻叫喚の場面でした。こんなことが毎日繰り返されることを思うと、親になるって大変なことなんですね。
 で、僕達がパーティーの準備をしているあいだに、主役のMを含む24人の4、5歳の女の子達が何をしていたかというと、親の助けを借りて「プリンセス」に変身。ディズニーの映画から抜け出て来たように、白雪姫、ポカホンタス、プリンセス・オーロラが何人も。ちょうど、昨日のThe Independent紙の付録雑誌に、ディズニーを始め、子供達の願望をかなえる「シンデレラ産業」の隆盛が特集されていました。

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article2276120.ece

 僕は、最近M一人でもてこずることがありますが、4歳の女の子が24人いて、そろいも揃ってプリンセスになりきってドレスを纏っている場のパワーに言葉を失いました。彼女達を飽きさせないように、友人は幾つものアトラクションを用意していて、それも手伝いましたけど、驚きの連続。例えば、ホールの片隅にうずくまっている子がいたので心配になって話し掛けた所、彼女は顔を上げました。そしておもむろに「私はいま蝶なの。だから、話し掛けないで」、と真顔でいわれた時には、一瞬、思考が止まりました。
 パーティーが進むうちに、感極まって泣き出す子、泣いている子を慰める子、我関せずに踊りつづける子などなど、子供の世界って、大人が思っている以上に複雑なことがたくさん有るということを学びました。

 日本にいたとき、こんな経験をするなんてこと、予想もしていませんでした。が、まがりなりにも「親」になったような経験が出来て、ロンドンの生活もまだまだ捨てたもんじゃないな、と。
Template by まるぼろらいと

Copyright ©LONDON Love&Hate 愛と憎しみのロンドン All Rights Reserved.