LONDON Love&Hate 愛と憎しみのロンドン

1999年のクリスマス・イヴにロンドンに。以来、友人達に送りつけていたプライヴェイト・メイル・マガジンがもと。※掲載されている全ての文章の無断引用・転載を禁じます。
Home未分類 | Dance | Sylvie Guillem | Royal Ballet | Royal Opera | Counselling | Sightseeing | Overseas Travel | Life in London(Good) | Life in London(Bad) | Japan (Nihon) | Bartoli | Royal Families | British English | Gardens | Songs | Psychology | Babysitting | Politics | Multiculture | Society | Writing Jobs | About this blog | Opera Ballet | News | Arts | Food | 07/Jul/2005 | Job Hunting | Written In English | Life in London (so so) | Speak to myself | Photo(s) of the day | The Daily Telegraph | The Guardian | BBC | Other sources | BrokenBritain | Frog/ Kaeru | Theatre | Books | 11Mar11 | Stage | Stamps | Transport | Summer London 2012 | Weather | Okinawa | War is crime | Christoph Prégardien | Cats | Referendum 23rd June | Brexit | Mental Health 

日本で増え続ける空き家、廃墟、廃屋

2014.11.09
冬至までわずか2ヶ月とはいえ、毎年この時季、毎日のように日照時間が短くなって行くのは、何年暮らしても好きになれません。天気が良くても、正午の段階で既に夕暮れのようですから。

 9月に帰国して四国を訪れた時に、高松から松山までJRで移動しました。今ではどの辺りか全く思い出せないですが、途中、数軒の家が崩れかけているのを観ました。どの家の屋根には今でも黒光りする屋根瓦がありながら、ある家は屋根に大きな穴が空き、別の家は軒先が崩れかけていました。

 その時は、どこかで読むか聞くかした、日本国内で増えているらしい空き家が四国にまで広がっているのかと驚くだけでした。幹線の鉄道から見える所でも打ち捨てられた空き家があるのは、もはや止められない少子化の為なのか、それとも地方での暮らしが困難になりつつあるのか、判断材料を持っていませんでした。

 10月下旬、ファイナンシャル・タイムズが、日本国内で増え続ける空き家について短い分析記事を掲載しました。

Japan blighted by zombie housing
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/d95ea1f6-5512-11e4-b616-00144feab7de.html#axzz3IYqdMFFR

 この記事の中に、驚くような新しい事実や数字は無いです。野村総研によるデイタは面白かったです。僕個人としては、書かれていませんが、都市部への人口集中がこのような空き家が増えることを加速させているのではないかと感じました。

 四国で見かけた空き家が思った以上に僕の中では衝撃だったので、その後、熱心に追いかけていなかった「地方再生」に関連する記事に遭遇することが増えました。その中で、最も衝撃だったのが、鬼怒川温泉に関するこのニュース。

大型ホテルの廃墟が渓谷沿いに並ぶ「鬼怒川温泉」
http://deepannai.info/kinugawa-onsen-ruins/

 書き手の、「このような廃墟、早く観ておいた方が良いんじゃない?!」と感じられる文体には同調しません。東京から列車で1時間という距離にある鬼怒川温泉に、このような大きな廃墟が無防備で残されていることに驚きました。

 現在、欧州連合の熱い話題の一つ、移民・難民が毎日のように押し寄せる状況が日本には直ぐには起きないでしょう。しかし、仮にそのような状況が突然、来月にでも起きてしまった時に、首都圏から遠くない場所にあるこれほどの廃墟群は、不法占拠のまたとない標的になってしまうのではなかろうかと。

 国外で戦争をしたくてたまらない政治家の皆さんには、国内に存在するこのような危機要因は見えていないのでしょう。

 政府が進める「地方債性」の報道を読みながら感じていたのは、「これって、絶対にあり得ない、Win Win situationを延々と語っているだけではないのか?(http://loveandhatelondon.blog102.fc2.com/blog-entry-1759.html)」と。そんな時に遭遇した二つの情報。

「地方創生」論議で注目、増田レポート「地方が消滅する」は本当か? 木下斉
http://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/hl?a=20141027-00000017-wordleaf-pol

“地域活性化”を軽々しく語るな! 消え行く集落の最期を偲ぶ、「ふるさとの看取り方」
http://logmi.jp/25268

 特に二つ目は目から鱗。言い換えると、人が暮らしているとはいえ、その村、街、そして都市に終わりがないとは誰にも言えないということ。安倍政権への不信感がある僕の勝手な思い込みですが、現政府がやっていることは、「金をやるから、ゾンビのままでも残しておくか」という、小手先のことしかやっていないように思います。


Japan blighted by zombie housing
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/d95ea1f6-5512-11e4-b616-00144feab7de.html#axzz3IYqdMFFR

Louise Lucas in Tokyo

Yoko Irie sweeps autumn leaves from the pavement outside the house that neither she nor anyone else has lived in for the past four years.

Other homeowners are less considerate – or even dead – hence the blight cast on Japan’s landscape by more than 8m akiya, or empty homes. Some houses are derelict, some marooned in overgrown grassy plots. Others – such as 61-year-old Ms Irie’s – are in fine condition, complete with underfloor heating and tatami room.

Japan’s zombie houses, which account for roughly one in seven homes, reflect a dwindling populace and what one analyst calls a “scrap and build” mentality. The population peaked in 2008 and with a fertility rate of 1.4 children per woman and minimal immigration, a reversal is not on the cards.

“For 10 empty houses there are 10 different reasons,” shrugs Shigeo Shimada, who as head of Akiya Bank has the task of reducing the ranks of 500 or so such houses in Isumi City, a small suburb of Chiba prefecture an hour by train from Tokyo.

In the 1980s Japanese houses were typically built from wood and designed to last about 30 years. After 2000 that lifespan more than doubled to roughly 70 years, according to Wataru Sakakibara of the real estate division at Nomura Research Institute – still a blink of the eye by European standards.

“Given the many earthquakes, Japanese people didn’t contemplate making houses last any longer,” he says. “Instead, there was a notion to scrap and build.”

While other parts of the world focus on building more homes for expanding populations, Japan is faced with filling – or demolishing – its existing stock. Without any action, the government estimates 20 per cent of residential areas will become ghost towns by 2050, while Nomura reckons one in five homes will be empty by 2023.

Avoiding these scenarios would require overcoming structural obstacles, says Mr Sakakibara. It is expensive to bring in the wrecking ball – estimates vary from Y500,000-Y1m ($4,670-$9,340) – and doing so raises the owners’ tax bill on the land sixfold.

Under a policy devised at a time of population growth, fixed asset tax bills on land were reduced if owners built homes. Attempts to reverse this appear, so far, to have been unsuccessful.

That partly explains the unusual economics of housing in Japan, a country that once boasted the world’s most expensive real estate but where prices have more or less been in retreat since the 1992 peak. Houses themselves are a rapidly depreciating asset; Mr Sakakibara calculates that after 20 years the value resides only in the land.

Thus just 13.5 per cent of purchases were in the secondary market in 2008, the latest year for which government data are available. That compares with 90 per cent in the US in 2009 and 84 per cent in the UK in 2010.

Meanwhile, new houses and apartments continue to be built.

Mitsubishi Estate, one of Japan’s biggest developers, says its new homes should last for more than 100 years but notes that social demand – for unit size, facilities and equipment – changes over time. Another turning point was the introduction of new earthquake resistance criteria in 1981, rendering older buildings far less attractive.

All of which add to the dilemma faced up and down the country. To tackle it – and the attendant ills including the risk of fire and crime – Isumi City has set up a matchmaking service between the usually older owners of empty homes and younger families arriving in the area.

But take-up is slow, says Keigo Itakura, group leader of the Area promotion office. While there are 179 would-be renters, only half the owners of empty homes are known; others are dead or simply cannot be reached.

“It’s a generational change,” he sighs. “Parents used to own a holiday home here but the children who inherited them think it’s too far to come.”


関連記事
スポンサーサイト

Comment


管理者にだけ表示を許可する

Template by まるぼろらいと

Copyright ©LONDON Love&Hate 愛と憎しみのロンドン All Rights Reserved.